After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh."> After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh." /> After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh."/>
Tôi chưa bao giờ học hỏi được gì từ một người luôn đồng ý với tôi. (I never learned from a man who agreed with me. )Dudley Field Malone

Nhẫn nhục có nhiều sức mạnh vì chẳng mang lòng hung dữ, lại thêm được an lành, khỏe mạnh.Kinh Bốn mươi hai chương
Đừng than khóc khi sự việc kết thúc, hãy mỉm cười vì sự việc đã xảy ra. (Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened. )Dr. Seuss
Con người sinh ra trần trụi và chết đi cũng không mang theo được gì. Tất cả những giá trị chân thật mà chúng ta có thể có được luôn nằm ngay trong cách mà chúng ta sử dụng thời gian của đời mình.Tủ sách Rộng Mở Tâm Hồn
Đừng chọn sống an nhàn khi bạn vẫn còn đủ sức vượt qua khó nhọc.Sưu tầm
Hãy nhớ rằng, có đôi khi im lặng là câu trả lời tốt nhất.Đức Đạt-lai Lạt-ma XIV
Bậc trí bảo vệ thân, bảo vệ luôn lời nói, bảo vệ cả tâm tư, ba nghiệp khéo bảo vệ.Kinh Pháp Cú (Kệ số 234)
Mục đích của cuộc sống là sống có mục đích.Sưu tầm
Hãy cống hiến cho cuộc đời những gì tốt nhất bạn có và điều tốt nhất sẽ đến với bạn. (Give the world the best you have, and the best will come to you. )Madeline Bridge
Giữ tâm thanh tịnh, ý chí vững bền thì có thể hiểu thấu lẽ đạo, như lau chùi tấm gương sạch hết dơ bẩn, tự nhiên được sáng trong.Kinh Bốn mươi hai chương
Chỉ có cuộc sống vì người khác mới là đáng sống. (Only a life lived for others is a life worthwhile. )Albert Einstein

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