After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh."> After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh." /> After the time of Huineng, Chinese Chan began to branch off into numerous different schools, each with their own special emphasis, but all of which kept the same basic focus on meditational practice, personal instruction and grounded personal experience. During the late Tang and the Song periods, the tradition truly flowered, as a wide number of eminent teachers, such as Mazu 馬祖, Baijang 百丈, Yunmen 雲門 and Linji 臨濟 developed specialized teaching methods, which would become characteristic in each of the "five houses" 五家 of mature Chinese Chan. Later on, the teaching styles and words of these classical masters were recorded in such important Chan texts as the Biyan lu 碧巖録 (Blue Cliff Record) and the Wumen guan 無門關 (Gateless Barrier) which would be studied by later generations of students down to the present. Chan continued to be influential, along with Pure Land as a Buddhist religious force in China, although some energy was lost with the revival of Confucianism from the Song onward. Chan was mostly eliminated in China in the modern era with the appearance of the People's Republic, but still continues to hold a significant following in Taiwan.
Chan was gradually transmitted into Korea during the late Silla period (8th and 9th) centuries) as Korean monks of predominantly Hwaŏm 華嚴 and Consciousness-only 唯識 background began to travel to China to learn the newly developing tradition. The first transmission of Chan into Korea is attributed to a monk named Pŏmnang 法朗, but he was soon followed by a throng of Sŏn students, who later returned to Korea to establish the "nine mountain" 九山 schools, with "nine mountains" becoming a nickname for Korean Sŏn which survives down to the present. Korean Sŏn received its most significant impetus and consolidation from the Koryŏ monk Chinul 知訥, who established the Songgwangsa 松廣寺 as a new center of pure practice. It is from the time of Chinul that the predominant single meditational sect in Korea becomes the Chogye 曹溪, which survives down to the present in basically the same status. Toward the end of the Koryŏ and during the Chosŏn period the Chogye school would first be combined with the scholarly 教 schools, and then suffer from persecution at the hands of a Confucian influenced polity. Nonetheless, there would be a series of important teachers during the next several centuries, such as Hyegŭn 慧勤, T'aego 太古, Kihwa 己和 and Hyujŏng 休靜, who continued to developed the basic mold of Korean meditational Buddhism established by Chinul. Sŏn continues to be practiced in Korea today at a number of major monastic centers.
Despite the fact that Japanese Buddhists were aware of the development of the Chan school in China from a fairly early date, no formal schools were established until the 12-13th centuries, when Eisai 榮西 and Dōgen 道元 established the Rinzai 臨濟 and Sōtō 曹洞 schools, respectively. The Zen movement in Japan was fortunate to receive the patronage of the growing new force in Japanese politics, the military bakufu, and so both schools developed and throve for several centuries. But although the Shogunate of the Edo period supported Zen as an official religion, tight government control of the sect limited its creativity. Nonetheless, the Japanese schools of Zen produced a number of significant creative teachers, including such figures as Ikkyū 一休, Bankei and Hakuin 白隱. There are still a number of famous Zen monasteries preserved to the modern day in Japan, although the number of actual practicing Zen monks has declined sharply. [Dictionary References] Naka855a Iwa499 [Credit] cmuller(entry) Trang tra cứu Liên Phật Hội - Từ điển Hán Anh."/>
Trời sinh voi sinh cỏ, nhưng cỏ không mọc trước miệng voi. (God gives every bird a worm, but he does not throw it into the nest. )Ngạn ngữ Thụy Điển

Người cầu đạo ví như kẻ mặc áo bằng cỏ khô, khi lửa đến gần phải lo tránh. Người học đạo thấy sự tham dục phải lo tránh xa.Kinh Bốn mươi hai chương
Tìm lỗi của người khác rất dễ, tự thấy lỗi của mình rất khó. Kinh Pháp cú
Điều khác biệt giữa sự ngu ngốc và thiên tài là: thiên tài vẫn luôn có giới hạn còn sự ngu ngốc thì không. (The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits.)Albert Einstein
Thước đo giá trị con người chúng ta là những gì ta làm được bằng vào chính những gì ta sẵn có. (The measure of who we are is what we do with what we have.)Vince Lombardi
Bạn nhận biết được tình yêu khi tất cả những gì bạn muốn là mang đến niềm vui cho người mình yêu, ngay cả khi bạn không hiện diện trong niềm vui ấy. (You know it's love when all you want is that person to be happy, even if you're not part of their happiness.)Julia Roberts
Nếu bạn muốn những gì tốt đẹp nhất từ cuộc đời, hãy cống hiến cho đời những gì tốt đẹp nhất. (If you want the best the world has to offer, offer the world your best.)Neale Donald Walsch
Người vấp ngã mà không cố đứng lên thì chỉ có thể chờ đợi một kết quả duy nhất là bị giẫm đạp.Sưu tầm
Đừng chọn sống an nhàn khi bạn vẫn còn đủ sức vượt qua khó nhọc.Sưu tầm
Từ bi và độ lượng không phải là dấu hiệu của yếu đuối, mà thực sự là biểu hiện của sức mạnh.Đức Đạt-lai Lạt-ma XIV
Người khôn ngoan học được nhiều hơn từ một câu hỏi ngốc nghếch so với những gì kẻ ngốc nghếch học được từ một câu trả lời khôn ngoan. (A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer.)Bruce Lee

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